Frank

The following graph represents Frank's self-rated scores of stress, intimacy, self, and achievement. It covers data from 11 months of therapy.

Of the five symptoms of stress that Frank rated, only the highest score is rendered as a stress peak on this graph. The scores Frank gave to the nine elements of each sphere were averaged. The averages were used to graph the intimacy, self, and achievement scores.

To provide a reference point, Frank's maximum pretreatment experiences were each given a score of 10. The client's goal in therapy is to reach experience levels far beyond those previously reported.



1. After a dramatic struggle with intimacy, which is characterized by a sharp setback on 12/2/98, Frank almost gave up therapy. However, he was encouraged to persist until his own defenses against closeness could be overcome.

2. He persevered, and his intimacy broke through the defenses. By April 13, he had reached a higher level of intimacy than he had ever known.


The graph below tracks Frank's progress over the final 6 months of therapy.



(Of the five symptoms of stress that Frank rated, only the highest score is rendered as a stress peak on this graph. The scores Frank gave to the nine elements of each sphere were averaged. The averages were used to graph the intimacy, self, and achievement scores.)

1. After experiencing two dramatic spikes (May 1 and June 12) of defense reaction (symptoms) to treatment, Frank's intimacy emerged above self and achievement for the first time. His defenses were exhausted.
2. His intimacy continued to rise and during the last 4 months of therapy his intimacy scores increased at a faster rate than did his self and achievement scores. After a very long struggle, he finally felt safe to get close to Beth.
3. During the first 13 of 17 months of therapy, he had been guarded. Although, his intimacy had advanced, it never reached the level of his self and achievement. Beth's dramatic progress through therapy encouraged Frank to make his own breakthrough in his intimacy with Beth.

Frank's graph was atypical in that he seemed to show a stage II pattern at the very end of an extended therapy. Beth seemed to stabilize dramatically.

The four stages of personality transformation are described in detail at Lifetrack Concepts: Intimacy to Growth


Frank's graphs showed that while he had shown extraordinary patience and dedication to Beth, who had been constantly troubled and sick, he manifested his own defensiveness against closeness. When Beth finally transformed herself through therapy, she became a better and more equal partner to him.

This baffling and yet universal "sea-saw phenomenon" is described in-depth in the eManual: "Breakthrough Intimacy - Sad to Happy through Closeness". The seesaw phenomenon is a typical reason for marriage failure. Therapists must recognize and help clients overcome defenses that manifest themselves in sequence. This recognition makes the three-way teamwork of the Lifetrack format successful
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Frank's testimonial [top]

Graphs and analysis of Frank's wife, Beth, can be found at View Beth's Graphs and Dr. Ishizuka's Analyses.

  




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